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Understanding the Different Types of IT Documentation

Documentation in IT can be divided into several sections, including:

Technical documentation

This includes documentation related to the technical details of a software or system, such as architecture diagrams, API reference guides, and installation instructions. For example, a power user may use technical documentation to understand how to install and configure a specific software package on their system, while an advanced user may use it to understand how to integrate the software with other systems they are working on.

User documentation

This includes documentation related to how end-users interact with a software or system, such as user manuals, tutorials, and FAQs. For example, a power user may use user documentation to learn about advanced features of a software package, while an advanced user may use it to learn how to train a machine learning model using the software.

Development documentation

This includes documentation related to the development process of a software or system, such as coding standards, best practices, and development guidelines. For example, a power user may use development documentation to understand how to contribute to an open source project, while an advanced user may use it to learn about the development process of a specific software package.

Operations documentation

This includes documentation related to the operation and maintenance of a software or system, such as troubleshooting guides, security guidelines, and disaster recovery plans. For example, a power user may use operations documentation to understand how to troubleshoot a problem they are experiencing with a software package, while an advanced user may use it to learn about the security features of a software package and how to implement them.

Compliance documentation

This includes documentation that is required to comply with regulations, standards, and laws, such as data protection and privacy policies, security certifications, and regulatory compliance. For example, a power user may use compliance documentation to understand how to comply with regulations when using the software package, while an advanced user may use it to learn about the security standards and compliance requirements that the software is designed to meet.

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