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Bash Your Way to Easy Disk Partitioning

Writing a Bash Script to Automate Disk Partitioning

Disk partitioning is a useful tool for managing multiple hard drives and preparing them for use. Bash scripts can be a powerful tool for automating disk partitioning, as they allow a user to create a script to quickly and easily partition a drive.

The Basics of Disk Partitioning

Disk partitioning involves dividing a hard drive into multiple sections. Each section is treated as a separate disk, and can be used for different purposes. For example, one section can be used for the operating system, while another section can be used for storing files. By partitioning a hard drive, users can better organize their data, as well as make better use of available storage space.

Writing a Bash Script for Automated Partitioning

When writing a Bash script to automate disk partitioning, there are several key commands that must be included. The first command is fdisk, which is used to create new partitions on a disk. The fdisk command takes several parameters, such as the size of the partitions and the type of filesystem used.

Another important command is mkfs, which is used to format the partitions created with fdisk. mkfs takes parameters such as the type of filesystem to use and the label of the partition.

The last command to include in the Bash script is mount, which is used to mount the partitions to the directory tree. mount takes parameters such as the mount point of the partition and the permissions of the filesystem.

Practical Use-Cases with Examples

Now that we know the basics of writing a Bash script to automate disk partitioning, let’s look at some practical use-cases of the script.

The first use-case is to partition a hard drive into multiple sections for different purposes. For example, let’s say we want to partition a 500 GB hard drive into two sections, one for the operating system and one for storing files. We can use the fdisk command to create two partitions, one of 200 GB for the operating system, and one of 300 GB for storing files. We can then use the mkfs command to format the partitions, and the mount command to mount the partitions to the directory tree.

# Create two partitions with fdisk
fdisk /dev/sda --size 200G --type ext4
fdisk /dev/sda --size 300G --type ext4

# Format the partitions with mkfs
mkfs -t ext4 /dev/sda1
mkfs -t ext4 /dev/sda2

# Mount the partitions to the directory tree
mount -t ext4 /dev/sda1 /mnt/os
mount -t ext4 /dev/sda2 /mnt/files

Another use-case is to resize an existing partition. For example, let’s say we want to increase the size of an existing partition from 200 GB to 300 GB. We can use the fdisk command to resize the partition, then use the MKfs command to format the partition, and the mount command to mount the partition to the directory tree.

# Resize the partition with fdisk
fdisk /dev/sda --size 300G

# Format the partition with mkfs
mkfs -t ext4 /dev/sda1

# Mount the partition to the directory tree
mount -t ext4 /dev/sda1 /mnt/os

By writing a Bash script to automate disk partitioning, users can quickly and easily partition and format their hard drives. With a few simple commands, users can easily partition their hard drives and prepare them for use.

Additional Commands

mkfs and mount are essential commands for creating and formatting partitions, but there are other commands that can be used to customize the partitioning process. The parted command can be used to create, resize, and delete partitions, as well as list information about partitions. The blkid command can be used to list the UUIDs of partitions, which can be useful for referencing partitions in scripts. Finally, the mkpart command can be used to create a new partition within an existing partition table.

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